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Looking To the Future

Coronavirus. Six months ago, it’s a word few of us had even heard. Now, it’s in nearly every headline and news article and email subject line across the globe. It has sparked anxiety, uncertainty and an array of mixed emotions.

7 Steps for Implementing a Successful Behavior Change Program

Behavior change is difficult in any context. As the late English writer Samuel Johnson once said, “The chains of habit are too weak to be felt, until they are too strong to be broken.”

We all harbor some degree of resistance to changing habits. It is common to become so familiar with a routine that it becomes a source of comfort. That’s why becoming more energy efficient, though appealing on paper, is a much more strenuous effort than it initially seems.

Changing habits and behavior is best achieved through support, reminders, incentives, community pressure, goal setting, and more. Finding a successful strategy is critical to behavior change, but this process is often challenging. Enter the new ACEEE report “Reducing Energy Waste through Municipally Led Behavior Change Programs,” which established a sequence of seven steps for local governments to shape viable municipally led behavior change programs. Let’s break these steps down and explore how they work.

Why Education is the Future of Energy Efficiency

By 2040, world population is expected to reach 9.2 billion people, up from 7.4 billion today. Over that same period, global GDP will likely double; billions of people are expected to join the global middle class.

Rising living standards for expanding populations worldwide mean a dependence on reliable modern energy. The global energy demand is expected to rise by about 25 percent by the year 2040. That is roughly equivalent to adding another North America and Latin America to the world’s current energy demand.

Utilities Awaken to Electric Vehicles

Despite the obvious need to spark new revenue streams, electric utilities have not been particularly aggressive in their embrace of electric vehicles (EVs) as a potential source of new demand.  

BREAKING: Top 4 Must-Watch EISA LED Issues – DOE Clarifies LED Rules

The 45 lm/W backstop has not been triggered. This is one of the key clarifications published as the Department of Energy (DOE) moved forward to withdraw the revised definition of General Service Lamps (GSLs) which were set to take effect January 1, 2020 as part of the rulemaking process required by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). The DOE submitted their final ruling in July for EO 12866 regulatory review by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) and it was officially published in the Federal Register on 9/5/2019. There were several key clarifications from the published final ruling and a separately published proposed determination.

THE FOREFRONT OF INNOVATION

Want to stay abreast of regulatory updates, inspiring innovations and thought leadership related to grid optimization? Welcome to our blog, where Franklin Energy’s experts come to delve into everything you need to know to stay at the top of your game in our ever-changing environment.

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